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Les Misérables November 14, 2006

Posted by Cobus in Emerging Church, Journal, Missional.
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I have the opportunity of spending a few days at home at the moment. Part of the reason why I get more time to update the blog, but I also get more time to see some movies. My dad’s DVD collection contains some classic films, and films that contain more than the general simplistic entertainment most films are guilty of.

I watched Les Misérables a few days ago. Again, as with Fiddler on the Roof there were a multitude of plots, and a lot of scenes which really get you thinking. I’m not even going to try and explain the film, but do yourself the favour and see it!

Fantine is working in a factory in early 19th Century France, and is found to have a child, while she is not married. For this she is fired, because her superiors “don’t want our ladies to be exposed to corruption.”, referring to the other women working in the factory.

Immediately Fantine had my sympathy, how could they do this to her? She needed to support her child, she needed this job now more than ever. But I also saw something of what happens in our churches. When young girls need us most, we need to punish them, because “we cannot afford to let our young people think that it is OK”. I saw something of the church that cannot reach out and pull in the people they were called to serve, the people that need them most, in fear of “exposing priceless members to corruption”. We were called to reach out to people like Fantine. God will change people. It’s not our task to change people before we are willing to pull them in.

The church is supposed to be the community of people that follow Christ, the community that reach out to people that need Christ, the community that themselves need Christ. Instead we have made it the community of the powerful. A community that needs to be kept intact. A community that is so afraid of “contamination”, it cannot reach out to the world it was called to serve.

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